In Ukraine, graft has become so pervasive that only Russia, with its annexation of Crimea and the low-grade war in the east, seems to pose a greater threat to the nation's security. Young Ukrainians have become so inured to corruption that it's no longer seen as exceptional. Officials in Kiev, never lacking for imagination, have decided to address the problem head-on this month by opening "Corruption Park" at the city's botanical gardens, in an apparent effort to shed light on a typically invisible problem.

A series of domes resembling a space colony are hosting virtual reality, 3D and interactive installations to offer a historical overview of corruption, from ancient Sumeria to the present. 

Eka Tkeshelashvili, head of the European Union's Anti-Corruption Initiative in Ukraine, told Interfax: "Young people become more tolerant to corruption. They don't want to read long texts about anti-corruption investigations and dig deep into this problem."

Maybe a pop-up park—replete with such items as a 100-meter-long, golden loaf of bread, assorted confiscated riches of crooked politicians and the tools of the Sisyphean officials who combat corruption—is a better way to get the message out. 

"It describes corruption as a phenomenon that no one in the world was able to eradicate completely," Tkeshelashvili said. "However, the world knows examples of how the level of corruption has been reduced to a minimum, followed by economic growth."

Ukraine's problem afflicts the world, too. Experts estimate that dirty money currently accounts for almost 2 percent of the global gross domestic product.

Nine inflatable domes dot the botanical gardens in Kiev, where visitors can pretend to crack down on rogue politicians or view "gifts" handed over as bribes.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

Kick back like a power broker and watch "Dreams of a Corrupt Politician," which features a nightmarish montage of luxuries and criminal prosecutions.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

At the Solutions dome, the lofty roles of "Detective" (bottom right) and "International Cooperation" (top right) float above visitors' heads in balloons—not to say they're out of reach.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

A portrait of Taras Shevchenko, a Ukrainian poet and public figure who laid the foundation for Ukrainian literature and got in trouble for mocking members of the Russian imperial family.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

An aerosol pavement painting directs botanical garden visitors to Corruption Park.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

A virtual reality headset briefly turns an ordinary citizen into a member of the National Anti-Corruption Bureau of Ukraine, whose toolkit stands in the foreground. 

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

A lavish chandelier hangs among the displayed riches that were acquired via graft. 

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

Balloons read "Abuse of Office" (left), "Contraband" (center) and "Oligarchs."

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

On display are various luxury items acquired through graft.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

Visitors can engage in a virtual reality quest, using the perspective of an anti-corruption official. 

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

"Turn on the lamp, and check if this bill is marked," reads a display in a dome highlighting the strategies of anti-corruption officials.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg

Disturbingly, it appears that corruption can inspire romance.

Photographer: Misha Friedman/Bloomberg